Ouroboros Tiki Mug

$10.00$515.00
Adding to cart

Sergeant Tiki

$10.00$250.00
Adding to cart

Kabuki Tiki

,
$10.00$535.00
Adding to cart

Lost Tiki

, ,
$10.00$1,800.00
Adding to cart

Pu’uhonua O Honaunau

,
$60.00$5,000.00
Adding to cart
Adding to cart
Adding to cart

Koa Warrior

,
$5.00$3,500.00
Adding to cart

Ku

,
$5.00$3,000.00
Adding to cart
  • Ouroboros Tiki Mug

    “Ourobors Tiki” is a painting of a tiki mug character, who symbolizes the ancient Egyptian ouroboros symbol in a humorous way.  The ouroboros symbol usually depicts a serpent or dragon eating its own tail. It is a symbol of infinity that is represented by something constantly recreating itself.  It also represents the infinite cycle of nature's endless creation and destruction, life and death.

    This piece was made during the 9th annual Mai Tai Festival at the Royal Kona Resort on the Big Island of Hawaii.  Painted with many layers of acrylic on birch panel, “Ourobors Tiki” comes in a custom frame.  The frame is embellished with hand-carved tiki corners and is stained a rich blue color.  The painting measures 8″x10″ and the frame brings the total size to 14.5″x12″.

    $10.00$515.00

    View Product
  • Sergeant Tiki

    I’m calling this one “Sergeant Tiki” and it is a salute to how returning soldiers, from the South Pacific, introduced tiki culture to Americans after WWII. Many of these vets brought home tropical souvenirs and told great stories of their adventures from this far away paradise. “Sergeant Tiki” also reflects my own personal experience in the army, as well as my residence in Hawai’i. I spent 4 1/2 years in the military and was stationed in a small Bavarian town in Germany called Kitzingen. I later got deployed to Macedonia and Kosovo (the Disneyland of Europe) and spent about 8 months there. Now that I teach art here in Hawai’i, I make it a point to tell my students about my service and deployment, and I always get the same question: “Did you kill anyone?” And since I want to seem like a tough guy, I usually respond with, “I’m not allowed to talk about that”. Truth be told when my dad asked me, “What did you do in the Army son?” I answered with one word, “HIDE!” So Sergeant Tiki really encompasses the kind of soldier I was, I wanted to appear tough, but honestly I just wanted to sit on the beach and drink Mai Tais while I threw Pineapples at my commanders.

    This painting was made with acrylic on birch panel and measures 5″x7″.  It comes in a rustic wood frame bringing the total size to 11.5″x9.5″.

    $10.00$250.00

    View Product
  • Kabuki Tiki

    ,

    This unique piece of Japanese tiki decor combines cultural elements taken from Japan’s kabuki mask, and meshes them with traditional Polynesian tiki features.  “Kabuki Tiki” is a salute to the integration of Japanese culture with Hawaiian lifestyle.  This unique piece of tiki decor celebrates the profound impact and influence that Japan has had on Hawaii’s food, language, and people.

    “Kabuki Tiki” was made during Waimea’s annual Cherry Blossom Festival.  It was painted with many layers of acrylic paint and then enhanced with enamel line work.  It measures 10″x16″ and is painted on a smooth Birch panel.  Although the original painting has sold there are many print options to choose from.

    $10.00$535.00

    View Product
  • Lost Tiki

    , ,

    A relic that has been long forgotten sits on the ocean floor as it looks to the surface surrounded by kelp hoping to one day be found again.  “Lost Tiki” is a reminder of how the ocean claims victims to all who fall below her surface.

    Made with many layers of acrylic paint and then enhanced with enamel line work “Lost Tiki” measures 12″x16″ and is painted on a smooth Birch panel.  It comes in custom rustic wood frame bringing the total size to 20″x22″ giving the piece a look of antiquity.

    $10.00$1,800.00

    View Product
  • Pu’uhonua O Honaunau

    ,

    I painted this tiki gods piece as a submission into the Maui Arts and Cultural Center Hawaii National Parks Centennial 2016.  The site of Pu’uhonua O Hanaunau is a unique blend of natural and cultural resources where the idyllic Hawaiian landscape is made sacred by human influence.  The power of the site is emphasized in the painting through bold line work and exaggerated colors that highlight the significance of this historic place.  The frame is constructed to enhance the painting in the same way that the structural elements of Pu’uhonua O Hanaunau enhance the site.

    The original paining is painted with acrylic and enamel on birch panel and measures 48″x20″.  The frame is custom built from black walnut and is enhanced with rope details bringing the total size to 34″x61″.  

    $60.00$5,000.00

    View Product
  • Tiki Skeleton Dancer

    , ,

    This unique Tiki Mask painting incorporates Day of the Dead imagery with Hawaiian Tiki culture. A skeleton wears a tiki mask while dancing around with a tiki torch with a green lit flame.

    In Polynesian culture, tiki torches were used in religious ceremonies to pay respects to the gods.  Pele the goddess of fire and light, was the god who was most often venerated by the tiki torch.

    The piece was made with acrylic and enamel on birch panel and measures 8″x12″. It comes in a custom wood frame with wood burnt tribal details bringing the total size to 13″x15″. Although the original painting has sold there are still paper and canvas print options available!

    $5.00$515.00

    View Product
  • Model Tiki Joy Ride

    , ,

    This unique Tiki Skeleton painting incorporates Day of the Dead imagery with Hawaiian Tiki culture.  “Model Tiki” is a narrative of a father and son going on a joy ride into the lush jungle of Hawaii in a car they built together. This is a great piece for all tiki and car culture lovers.

    The piece was made with acrylic and enamel on birch panel and measures 16″x20″.

    $10.00$2,500.00

    View Product
  • Koa Warrior

    ,

    Koa Warrior is a mash up of Day of the Dead iconography with Hawaiian culture. The skeleton is derived from the Mexican holiday Dia de los Muertos and is represented in traditional Hawaiian war clothing.

    The mushroom helmet was worn by high ranking chiefs or Ali’i who often went to battle.  The cloak was also worn by Ali’i and was usually made out of local bird feathers.  One of the most popular weapons of the Polynesian culture is the Leiomano which means the lei of the shark, it is a paddle made of koa wood, inset with shark teeth.  The ship in the background references to the arrival of Captain Cook who the Hawaiians had mistaken for the god Lono.

    This painting is made with acrylic and enamel on panel.  It measures 24″x 17″ and comes in a custom built Koa frame with rope details bringing the total size to 38″x 21″

    $5.00$3,500.00

    View Product
  • Ku

    ,

    Kū is one of the four main Hawaiian tiki gods. He is the god of war and is the only god who is worshiped with human sacrifice.

    Kū is painted with acrylic and enamel on a 11.5″x15″ birch panel.  He comes in a custom frame made from endemic Koa wood from the Big Island of Hawaii and is embellished with sculpted tiki tiles and rope details, measuring 19.5″x23″ in total.

    $5.00$3,000.00

    View Product